I PLANTED SOME HERBS—WHAT SHOULD I DO WITH THEM?

So–you planted some herbs in your garden.  Now what?  How should you put these delightful plants to good use? Many herbs smell heavenly and look beautiful in flower arrangements, but you may find that the greatest reward comes from using your herbs in the kitchen. Throughout the season, remember to pinch back the flowers from your herbs regularly.  This insures continuous and bushy growth.   Try to harvest herbs early in the day, before the hot sun draws out the flavorful essential oils.  When harvesting, cut stem at a node about 1/3 of the way down. When you get your herbs into the house, rinse them briefly in cool water and pat them dry.  Remove the leaves from the stems and use a sharp knife to chop them for your recipe.  As a rule, if your recipe calls for dried herbs, use 3 times the amount of fresh herbs. (For example, for 1 teaspoon of dried oregano, use 3 teaspoons fresh oregano.)  If you are using herbs in a  recipe  that requires cooking, add them toward the end of the cooking time.  If they are going into an uncooked dish, add them early in the process so that the flavors have time to blend and...

JUNE IS BUSTIN’ OUT ALL OVER!

And blooming!  Be on the lookout for colorful flowering trees and plants that are at their peak in June—including: Kousa Dogwood trees Japanese Lilacs Weigela Hydrangea Roses Salvia Astilbe Siberian Iris Lavender Foxglove Yarrow Also watch for things that may not be so attractive: Mosquitoes Japanese beetles Sawfly larvae  feeding on leaves of  Mountain Ash Hibiscus sawfly Leaf miners on Birch trees Thrips  (leave holes in rosebuds) Blackspot on some varieties of  roses Magnolia scale What to do in the garden this month? Scout for diseases and insects Fertilize roses and check them for black spot Take softwood cuttings from perennials Deadhead annuals Pinch flowers from culinary...
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